NETWORKS AND RHYTHMS IN ENDOCRINE GLANDS
Department: Physiology - Research axis: Molecular and cellular network

Research subject

Our team research objectives converge on a long-standing yet fundamental question in endocrinology: "how is the production and release of peptide hormones controlled?"
Although pulsatile hormone secretion is obligatory for controlling a wide-range of downstream physiological processes, the tissue-level mechanisms that underlie generation of highly ordered hormone pulses remain largely unknown.

Scientific highlights during the past five years:
1- Identification and analysis of 3D-endocrine cell networks have altered the concept of the pituitary—“master” gland of our organism—as a static organ which non-dynamically responds to hypothalamic inputs, to a gland capable of integrating and memorising numerous external cues to appropriately adapt tissue output to prevailing environmental conditions (J Endocrinol 2009, PNAS 2010a, Endocrinology 2010a, PNAS 2011, Endocrinology 2011a&b, Nat Commun 2012).
2- Analysis of clock genes in the pituitary and target tissues has unveiled their roles in ultradian hormone rhythms (JBC 2009), most likely via their expression at the pituitary level (PloS One 2010a)
3- In situ analysis of parvocellular neurons (GHRH and TIDA) has unveiled their responses to peripheral signals (PLoS one 2010b) and their plasticity during physiological demands (J. Neurosci. 2013) or brain disorders (submitted)
4-Cellular in vivo imaging approaches allowed high-resolution capture of the dynamic endocrine-vascular relationships which finely-tune pituitary hormone pulse generation (PNAS 2010b) and fast hormone access to the hypothalamus (PNAS 2013)

Our research activities are currently supported by four on-going ANR grants, national research infrastructure “France-BioImaging”, ANSES and FP7 Marie Curie grants.

 

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Team

Team leader

Patrice Mollard
DR1, CNRS


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Staff

Xavier Bonnefont
CRCN, CNRS


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Pauline Campos
Chercheur CDD, CNRS


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  04 34 35 92 91

 

Lama El Cheikh
Doctorant(e), UM


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  04 34 35 92 76

 

Tatiana Fiordelisio
Post-doctorant(e), CNRS


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  04 34 35 92 91

 

Pierre Fontanaud
AI, CNRS


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  04 34 35 92 92

 

Evelyne Galibert
TCN, CNRS


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  04 34 35 93 08

 

Matan Golan
Chercheur CDD, CNRS


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  04 34 35 92 91

 

Anne Guillou
AI, CNRS


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  04 34 35 92 91

 

Yasmine Kemkem
Doctorant(e), UM


  IGF Nord 15b

  04 34 35 92 76

 

Chrystel Lafont
IECN, Inserm


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  04 34 35 92 92

 

Agnès Martin
CRCN, CNRS


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  04 34 35 93 14

 

Francois Molino
MCF, UM


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  04 34 35 93 06

 

Marie Schaeffer
CRCN, Inserm


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  04 34 35 92 92

 


Major publications

  • Schaeffer M, Langlet F, Lafont C, Molino F, Hodson DJ, Roux T, Lamarque L, Verdie P, Bourrier E, Dehouck B, Baneres JL, Martinez J, Mery PF, Marie J, Trinquet E, Fehrentz JA, Prevot V, Mollard P. Rapid sensing of circulating ghrelin by hypothalamic appetite-modifying neurons. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2013; 110(4): 1512-7.
  • Romanò N, Yip SH, Hodson DJ, Guillou A, Parnaudeau S, Kirk S, Tronche F, Bonnefont X, Le Tissier P, Bunn SJ, Grattan DR, Mollard P, Martin AO. Plasticity of hypothalamic dopamine neurons during lactation results in dissociation of electrical activity and release. J Neurosci. 2013 Mar 6;33(10):4424-33.
  • Hodson DJ, Schaeffer M, Romano N, Fontanaud P, Lafont C, Birkenstock J, Molino F, Christian H, Lockey J, Carmignac D, Fernandez-Fuente M, Le Tissier P, Mollard P. Existence of long-lasting experience-dependent plasticity in endocrine cell networks. Nat Commun. 2012; 3605.
  • Lafont C, Desarmenien MG, Cassou M, Molino F, Lecoq J, Hodson D, Lacampagne A, Mennessier G, El Yandouzi T, Carmignac D, Fontanaud P, Christian H, Coutry N, Fernandez-Fuente M, Charpak S, Le Tissier P, Robinson IC, Mollard P. Cellular in vivo imaging reveals coordinated regulation of pituitary microcirculation and GH cell network function. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2010; 107(9): 4465-70
  • Bur IM, Cohen-Solal AM, Carmignac D, Abecassis PY, Chauvet N, Martin AO, van der Horst GT, Robinson IC, Maurel P, Mollard P, Bonnefont X. The circadian clock components CRY1 and CRY2 are necessary to sustain sex dimorphism in mouse liver metabolism. J Biol Chem. 2009; 284(14): 9066-73.

 

 

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